Kniffler online dating

Once upon a time, online daters were mocked as lonely losers, or worse. Today, at least 40 million Americans are looking for love on the Web. Like sex, love and attraction, online dating is an object of fascination and confusion.

Some commentators credit it with helping singles feel more secure and confident, while others blame it for “ruining romance,” “killing commitment” and contributing to the rise of the hook-up culture. While women generally prefer men around their own age, men are most attracted to 20-year-olds, period.

It’s very deliberate — after all, you’re looking for a partner through an interface — and that creates a safer environment. This premise is so well-worn that sites like Tinder, Hinge and Coffee Meets Bagel offer little information about users beyond a collection of pictures and a two-line profile.

“Online services enable a downright Seinfeld-ian level of superficial nitpickiness,” one Fortune article lamented.

They’ve “given rise to a pick-and-choose shopping behavior that prioritizes looks more than ever before.” In reality, how someone looks in a couple of pictures is no indicator of whether you’ll be attracted to them.

That point was driven home for me during a small publicity stunt Ok Cupid ran to promote a blind dating app; we called it Love Is Blind Day.

Time magazine editors found the notion of men dating women in their 30s so baffling that they invited 15 experts to explain the phenomenon.

One sociologist found that college-age students are having no more sex today than they were in 1988.

In fact, online dating has made it easier for those seeking long-term commitments to find each other.

This assumption is so prevalent that MTV has an entire show, “Catfish,” devoted to investigating whether people in online relationships are representing themselves honestly to their partners.

In one extreme example of an online lie, Notre Dame football star Manti Te’o was tricked a few years ago into virtually dating a woman who never existed.

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